Instructor Information

Raymond Ohl IV

Raymond G. Ohl IV received his BS in physics from the University of Richmond in 1994, his MA and PhD in astronomy from the University of Virginia in 1996 and 2000, respectively, and completed pre-doctoral work at the Johns Hopkins University. Since 2009, Ohl has taught a graduate course in introductory geometrical optics with the JHU’s Whiting School of Engineering. He has authored papers in the Proceedings of SPIE, Applied Optics, and astronomical journals. Ohl has served on the committee for SPIE's conference on Cryogenic Optical Systems and Instruments and serves on the committee for SPIE's conference on Optical System Alignment, Tolerancing, & Verification. Ohl is a Senior Member of SPIE.

Clinton Edwards

Clinton L. Edwards was a member of the Senior Professional Staff at The Johns Hopkins University - Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU-APL). He received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from The University of Maryland, College Park. Dr. Edwards has worked in the areas of electro-optical/infrared (EO/IR) systems for the United States Navy. He is currently the Assistant Program Manager for Naval Remote Sensing Algorithm Development in the Force Projection Sector of APL. His projects have included modeling stochastic processes relating to foliage penetration, as well as image processing, discrimination and enhanced tracking algorithms for EO/IR cameras and other remote sensing technologies. He has also worked on various projects for the Office of Naval Research. His Ph.D. research included first-principles modeling and validation of the pointing and jitter performance of two-axis (tip-tilt) MEMS mirrors and a generalized model for electrostatic two-axis (tip-tilt) structures. He has authored papers in the Journal of Applied Optics, the SPIE Journal of Micro/Nanolithography, MEMS and MOEMS and the IEEE Journal of Microwave Theory and Techniques as well as other conference proceedings. Dr. Edwards is a Senior Member of IEEE and a member of Eta Kappa Nu and Tau Beta Pi. Dr. Edwards has developed and taught graduate courses with the Johns Hopkins University - Whiting School of Engineering (JHU-WSE) including "Principles of Optics" (EN.615.471), "Digital Signal Processing" (EN.525.427), "ECE Fundamentals: Circuits, Devices and Fields" (EN.525.201) and "ECE Fundamentals: Signals and Systems" (EN.525.202). Dr. Edwards serves as the Vice Chair of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Program. Dr. Edwards enjoys running, swimming, and cycling and spending time with his family. He and his wife, Corinne, are the parents of five wonderful children and live near Columbia, MD.

Course Information

Course Description

This course teaches the student the fundamental principles of geometrical optics, radiometry, vision, and imaging and spectroscopic instruments. It begins with a review of basic, Gaussian optics to prepare the student for advanced concepts. From Gaussian optics, the course leads the students through the principles of paraxial ray-trace analysis to develop a detailed understanding of the properties of an optical system. The causes and techniques for the correction of aberrations are studied. The course covers the design principles of optical Instruments, telescopes, microscopes, etc. The techniques of light measurement are covered in sessions on radiometry and photometry. Prerequisite(s): Undergraduate degree in physics or engineering.

Course Goal

This course teaches the student the fundamental principles of geometrical optics and radiometry. It begins with a review of basic imaging to prepare the student for more advanced concepts.  The nature of light and radiation is discussed and used to motivate the two major emphasis of this course:  Geometrical optics and radiometry.  Radiometry is covered in detail.  An overview of blackbody radiation is presented.  In geometrical optics, thin and thick lens analysis is presented.  Basic optical systems illustrating fundamentals of design principles are reinforced through discussion of optical instruments such as telescopes, microscopes, etc. The human eye, functioning as an imaging system, is discussed.   The causes and techniques for the correction of aberrations are studied.  The intent of this course is to give the student a foundation for upper level Applied Physics courses in optics and photonics.  Additionally, this course contains hardware demonstrations to reinforce fundamental principles of geometrical optics.

Course Objectives

  • The objective of this course is to develop a fundamental understanding of geometrical optics and radiometry.  The student will gain experience making radiometric calculations, sketching rays, finding image location and magnification information using the thin lens equation and paraxial mirror equation, determine the paraxial parameters of an optical system using paraxial ray tracing, and gain familiarity with concepts like field of view, pupil space, field space, etc.
  • The student will gain experience making radiometric calculations.
  • The student will gain experience finding image location and magnification information using the thin lens equation and paraxial mirror equation.
  • The student will determine the paraxial parameters of an optical system using paraxial ray tracing.

When This Course is Typically Offered

See Course Schedule for Applied Physics.  This course is typically offered each semester, to best effort.

Syllabus

  • Radiometry
  • Elementary Optics
  • Mirrors and Lenses
  • Ray Tracing
  • Thin Lens
  • System Layout
  • Paraxial Ray Tracing
  • Thick Lens
  • Aberrations
  • System Performance Metrics
  • F-number
  • Field of View
  • Focal Length
  • Magnification

Student Assessment Criteria

Homework (multiple assignments) 30%
Mid-term Exam 30%
Final Exam 30%
Class Participation 10%

Computer and Technical Requirements

Basic proficiency in and access to a spreadsheet program is required for this course.  Examples include, but are not limited to, MS Excel, Numbers for Mac, and Google Spreadsheets.

Participation Expectations

Discussion forums associated with each Module.

Textbooks

Textbook information for this course is available online through the MBS Direct Virtual Bookstore.

Course Notes

There are no notes for this course.

Final Words from the Instructor

The required text book is Elements of Modern Optical Design by Donald O'Shea.  The optional, additional textbooks are Radiometry and Detection of Optical Radiation by Robert W. Boyd and Modern Optical Engineering by Warren J. Smith.

Term Specific Course Website

http://blackboard.jhu.edu

(Last Modified: 06/09/2020 12:11:22 PM)